Working For You Headline

CORPORATION COUNSEL (COR)

January 2021 – December 2023
  1. PRIVATE ACTIVITY BONDS (PAB)
    Lead in re-establishing, after a 20+ year hiatus, the City’s Multi-family Rental Housing Program through PAB conduit financing. These tax-exempt bonds enable low-cost financing for private borrowers for projects that serve a public purpose, in particular building affordable rental housing. Multi-family housing bonds continue to be the primary use of the total volume of tax-exempt PABs issued by the City and State due to the ongoing demand for affordable rental housing. Paired with non-competitive Federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) and the competitive Hawai‘i State LIHTC, PABs facilitate the development of affordable multi-family housing. The City’s re-entry into this program ensures sufficient focus on Honolulu-based projects. Successfully closed the PAB financing of the City’s first two PAB affordable housing development projects in over 20+ years – Maunakea Towers (Chinatown) and Jack Hall (Waipahu).
  2. PROPERTY ACQUISITION FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING
    Provided legal work on the City’s acquisition of properties for affordable housing, including Waikiki Vista, a former dormitory building that will add affordable rental units to the City’s inventory, and Iwilei Center, a commercial industrial property that the City plans to convert into a multi-use, multi-income affordable housing project in an activated TOD community with complete streets and parks/recreational spaces, all adjacent to the Iwilei rail station. Waikiki Vista and Iwilei are the two largest property purchases made by the City.
  3. PROPERTY TRANSFERS FROM HART TO DTS
    Supported the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation (HART) and the Department of Transportation Services (DTS) in the transfer of the first operating segment of the rail system from HART to DTS, including ensuring that contracts and real property agreements transition from construction to operation and maintenance (O&M), and that all necessary arrangements, agreements, authorizations, permissions, and protections were in place to begin passenger service.
  4. ENV GLOBAL CONSENT DECREE
    Assisted the Department of Environmental Services (ENV) with the closure of the collection system portion of the Global Consent Decree, the culmination of ten (10) years of work and approximately $1.5 billion in capital improvements to the City’s wastewater collection system.
  5. SENSITIVE PLACES LAW
    In response to the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Bruen on the public carrying of firearms assisted the Honolulu Police Department (HPD) in developing and implementing new administrative rules and assisted the City Council with the “sensitive places” law.
  6. UTILITY RELOCATIONS
    Assisted HART with developing, executing, interpreting, and amending its contracts for utility relocations through the City Center Segment of the Project.
  7. MAKIKI LIBRARY – UNITED KOREAN ASSOCIATION COMMUNITY CENTER
    Assisted the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) in repurposing a portion of the Makiki Library Building into a new community center servicing surrounding communities in association with the United Korean Association.
  8. ANTI-BULLYING LEGISLATION
    Drafted Bill 52, Bullying of Youth Prohibited, (ROH section 2-44), introduced by Councilmember Tulba, which prohibits bullying in City programs and on City property, and requires certain City agencies to implement policies and procedures for reporting and responding to incidents of bullying.
  9. DEFENSE VERDICT
    Obtained a defense verdict in a jury trial in the Circuit Court of the First Circuit, State of Hawai‘i. The plaintiff alleged defamation of character. The jury found that HPD’s former Police Chief did not defame Plaintiff.
  10. DEFENSE VERDICT
    Obtained a defense verdict in a jury trial in the Circuit Court of the First Circuit, State of Hawai‘i. The plaintiff sued the City for negligence and alleged he injured his foot after stepping in an uncovered irrigation box at Māʻili Beach Park. The jury found that the City was not the cause of Plaintiff’s injury and returned a verdict in favor of the City.